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gaijinmark



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PostPosted: Thu Dec 22, 2011 7:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

gKazoku Game,h gShitsurakuenh director Morita Yoshimitsu dies at 61

December 21, 2011

Movie director Morita Yoshimitsu died of acute liver failure on Tuesday night at a hospital in Tokyo, it has been learned. He was 61 years old.

Morita started working with 8mm film during his time in the arts department of Nihon University. In 1981, he made his theatrical debut with the movie gNo You na Monoh (gSomething Like Ith), which earned Best Film and Best New Director at the Yokohama Film Festival. In 1983, he directed the critically acclaimed gKazoku Gameh (gThe Family Gameh), which starred Matsuda Yusaku with Itami Juzo and Yuki Saori.

Moritafs career included many other award-winning films, such as g(Haru),h gShitsurakuenh (gA Lost Paradiseh), and gAshura no Gotokuh (gLike Asurah). His final film before his death was the train otaku comedy gBokutachi Kyuukou ~A Ressha de Ikou~,h which is scheduled to open in March 2012 and stars Eita and Matsuyama Kenichi.

Source:
Sankei Sports
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 22, 2011 10:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

^ Only 61?

Sad. Sad
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 25, 2012 1:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Dragon Ash bassist IKUZONE dies at 46

April 24, 2012

Baba Ikuzo, better known as the bassist IKUZONE of the band Dragon Ash, has suddenly passed away at the age of 46. An announcement on the groupfs official website on Tuesday night revealed that IKUZONE died of acute heart failure on the night of April 21st.

IKUZONE had collapsed in his home studio and was discovered by his family. He was quickly taken to a hospital, where his death was confirmed at 10:55pm.

Dragon Ash was scheduled to perform at the Okuma Beach Fest 2012 event in Okinawa on April 28, but due to IKUZONEfs death, they have canceled their appearance.

IKUZONE was one of Dragon Ashfs founding members in 1996, along with Kj and Sakurai Makoto.

Source:
Natalie
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PostPosted: Fri May 18, 2012 5:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Susumu Kobayashi passes away at 58

Kobayashi Susumu has passed away from cirrhosis of the liver. He died at 10:45 in the afternoon on the 16th. He was 58.

According to people close to him, Kobayashi suffered from illness for several years, and after the filming of gOdoru Daisousasen THE FINAL Aratanaru Kibouh this year in February, he received a diagnosis of a remainder of 2 or 3 weeks left and became hospitalized.

Kobayashi worked as an actor since the 1990s, and he famously played the role of Tsukushifs father in gHana Yori Dangoh. Kobayashi also acted in roles in dramas such as gLong Vacationh and gSiberia Chou Tokyuuh.
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PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2012 7:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Shindo Kaneto passes away at the age of 100

On May 30, it was reported that Japanfs oldest movie director Shindo Kaneto passed away at 9:24 am on May 29 JST.

Shindo, who just celebrated his 100th birthday in April, never stopped making movies since starting his career during the pre-war period. He never lost his urge to create and his love for movies. He released his latest movie eIchimai no Hagakie at the end of 2011 at the age of 99, which earned him many awards.

According to the official statement, his granddaughter Shindo Kaze (a movie director herself), with whom he had been living, noticed that something was wrong and called their family doctor, but Shindo had already passed away before the doctor arrived. His last public appearance was at his birthday party on April 22. At the beginning of May, Shindo had become bedridden for most of the day and was only able to leave it for meals.

Shindo had lived a life full of ups and downs. In 1934, he entered the Shinko Kinema film studio and began to study under movie director Mizoguchi Kenji. After the Second World War, he started to work as a scriptwriter and made a name for himself by writing the script for Kinoshita Keisukefs eOjo-san Kanpai!e (eLetfs Toast the Young Ladye). However, when he was taunted for not being commercially successful, he founded the independent film company Kindai Eiga Kyokai in 1950 in order to have more freedom and not be pressured by big film studios.

In the following year, he made his directorial debut with eAisai Monogatarie, starring the late Otowa Nobuko who later became his wife. After some more or less successful independent movie projects, he released the low-budget movie eHadaka no Shimae (eThe Naked Islande) in 1960, which earned him a lot of praise at the Grand Prix at the Moscow International Film Festival.

His private life had just as many ups and downs. He married three times and had to experience bereavement just as many times. In 1978, he married Otowa Nobuko, who was diagnosed with liver cancer in 1994. Despite the cancer, Otowa decided not to pull out as the supporting actress in Shindofs movie project eGogo no Yuigon-joe (eA Last Notee), which later won multiple awards at the 1996 Japan Academy Awards, including Best Film, Best Director, Best Screenplay, and Best Supporting Actress. Otowa, however, already died after the filming had ended. Shindo stated, gShe found her happiness by being able to work until the very end.h

Shindo received the Order of Culture for his lifefs work in 2002.

In his final years, his desire to make movies continued to be as strong as ever. Not even his diabetes, which put him in hospital, the cataract which caused his right eye to become blind, or the impairment of his legs were able to stop him from making movies. eIchimai no Hagakif was the last movie he was able to finish in his 100 years.

He directed a total of 49 movies during his career and wrote the scripts for more than 250 other movies.
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 8:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Chii Takeo passes away to heart failure

At around 7 AM on June 29, actor Chii Takeo passed away in a hospital in Minato, Tokyo due to heart failure. Chii was known for his heartfelt acting and for the characters he played in gTaiyou ni Hoero!,h gKita no Kuni Kara,h along with his other roles in numerous TV dramas and movies. He is also remembered for his appearances on numerous variety programs.

Chii Takeo was 70 years old. He was born in Chiba prefecture.

After graduating from high school, he entered a school for actors. In 1968, he debuted in Okamoto Kihachifs film gKiru.h As a result of the success of his first starring role in the film gOkinawah in 1970, he went on to appear in two more movies of the same genre – gSensou to Ningenh and gKaigun Tokubetsu Shonenhei.h

From the 1980s on, he was active mainly in television dramas. He played a veteran detective in (Nihon TVfs) gTaiyou ni Hoero!h, and a close friend to the protagonist, played by Tanaka Kunie, in (Fuji TVfs) gKita no Kuni Kara.h

He also appeared in numerous historical plays and 2 hour dramas. He played an extensive variety of roles from the serious to the comical. Chii Takeo was a well-known supporting actor.

In recent years, he was lovingly known on variety programs as gChiiChii.h Moreover, he was known for his gChii Sanpoh (TV Asahi, Kanto Local) program where he walked through Tokyofs suburbs and introduced various locations, but in February of this year, he announced a break from the program due to health issues. It is said that starting in June, he was repeatedly hospitalized. Unfortunately, yesterday he succumbed to his illnesses.

Source: Sanspo
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2012 7:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Isuzu Yamada dead at 95

TOKYO -- Isuzu Yamada, who debuted in Japan's silent era and worked with the greatest directors of Japanese cinema's Golden Age, died Monday at age 95 after a long illness.

Born in 1917 in Osaka, Yamada joined the Nikkatsu studio in 1930 and made her screen debut that same year. In the 1930s she rose to stardom working for such leading Nikkatsu directors as Daisuke Ito, Mansaku Itami and Kenji Mizoguchi. Among her best-known roles in this period are of a woman entangled in a web of debt and deceit in "Osaka Elegy" and a cynical geisha whose sexual manipulations backfire in "Sisters of the Gion," both by Mizoguchi and both released in 1936.

In the postwar era, when Japanese cinema gained international recognition, while setting BO records at home, Yamada became an in demand character actress, playing a geisha teahouse proprietor in Mikio Naruse's "Flowing" (1956), the ruthless wife of an ambitiouslord in Akira Kurosawa's "Throne of Blood" (1957) and a domineering gang boss wife in "Yojimbo" (1961).

In the 1960s, as Japanese pics faded at the box office, Yamada made a successful transition to stage and television. She starred in many TV period dramas, including a 10-year run on the enduringly popular "Hissatsu" series.

Though her last pic was a 1985 adaptation from the "Hissatsu" show, Yamada continued her TV and stage work into her 80s, while adding to her already large collection of domestic acting prizes. In 2000 she became the first actress to be awarded the Order of the Sacred Treasure, Japan's highest cultural award.

In 2002 illness forced Yamada to retire.

Yamada had one daughter, Michiko Saga, from her marriage to fellow actor Ichiro Tsukita (1909-45). Saga also pursued a career in acting, but died at age 57 in 1992.

Think I'll watch "Throne of Blood" tonight to mark the occasion.
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 05, 2012 2:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Tsushima Keiko passes away at 86

At 10:20 AM on August 1st, actress Tsushima Keiko (Real Name: Mori Naoko), known for her roles in various films including gHimeyuri no Touh and gShichinin no Samuraih, passed away from stomach cancer at a hospital in Tokyo. She was 86 years old. Directly after the end of WWII, she played the role of a tidy girl; in her later years, she played the role of an elegant grandmother and supported numerous masterpieces. In recent years, however, she strayed from her activities as an actress.

Born in 1926 (Taisho 15) in Tsushima, Nagasaki, Tsushima originally planned on becoming a dancer, but she was scouted by director Yoshimura Kozaburou while teaching dance at the Shochiku Oofuna Film Studio. She debuted as an exclusive Shochiku actress in 1947 in Yoshimurafs gAnjouke no Butoukaih. Her stage name was created to pay homage to her place of birth, Tsushima, Nagasaki.

She distinguished herself with her dignified smile that suited an innocent actress and gained notice in director Ozu Yasujirofs gOchazuke no Ajih. After that, she became a free agent, and in 1953, she became a highly valued actress after starring in gHimeyuri no Touh (directed by Imai Tadashi), in which she played a female school teacher who led the Himeyuri students. (During the Battle of Okinawa, female Himeyuri students formed a front line nursing unit during WWII to support the Imperial Japanese Army.)

In 1954, she starred in Kurosawa Akirafs most famous work gShichinin no Samuraih (gSeven Samuraih). She appeared in a love scene as the daughter of a villager with Kimura Isao, who played a young samurai.

She was an actress who was loved by Japanfs greatest directors. While she was active as an actress, at the age of 31, she married Mori Ichio, who worked in the production department at Radio Tokyo (currently known as TBS), in 1957, and two years later, gave birth to a son. As if to reflect her happy personal life, once she reached her 40s, she gained popularity as she played the role of the elegant, levelheaded mother.

She appeared in NHKfs Taiga dramas including gOnna Taikoukih and gSangamoyuh and NHKfs morning drama gSakurah in 2002 as well as other TV dramas. In her later years, she played the role of the kind-hearted grandmother. While she stayed away from acting in recent years, she leaves behind a legacy as an actress who played daughter, mother, and grandmother roles.

Her funeral was conducted by her next of kin. The chief mourner at her funeral was her husband Mori Ichio.

Source: Sanspo
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2012 3:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

This is really a bad news, I'm a big fan of him. May her soul rest in peace


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2012 9:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Hideji Otaki passes away at 87
Kyodo

Actor Hideji Otaki, known for his unique and humorous presence in on the stage and in films, television dramas and commercials, died Tuesday of lung cancer at his home in Tokyo, a theatrical group he headed said Friday. He was 87.

After serving in the army during World War II, Otaki founded the Mingei Theater in 1950 with actress Tomoko Naraoka and others.

First grabbing attention for his performance in a 1975 NHK drama, he appeared in such films as Kei Kumai's "The Sands of Kurobe," Kon Ichikawa's "Clan of the Inugami," Akira Kurosawa's "Kagemusha" and Juzo Itami's "The Funeral."

Otaki won acclaim for many of his supporting roles in TV dramas and films. On the stage he performed mainly for Mingei Theater works, for which he received numerous awards.

He continued to work actively even after turning 80. His last film appearance was in the film "Anata e" ("Dearest") released in August, in which he costarred with actor Ken Takakura.

Sad

If it'll jog your memory, he played the owner of the bowling alley in "Golden Bowl" and the grandfather in "Sakura".
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2012 8:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Mitsuko Mori passes away at 92

Actress Mori Mitsuko passed away at the age of 92 due to heart failure caused by pneumonia on 10 November as announced by Toho on 14 November. Her private funeral was held on 14 November which was attended by her family members only. According to her nephew Yanagiba Toshiro, Mori had been admitted to a hospital since September but passed away during the hospitalisation period.

Mori portrayed the main character in "Horoki" more than 2,000 times and also played the main role in the popular TV drama "Jikan desu yo" (It's time). She received the Order of Culture and the People's Honor Award.

Source: Sanspo
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2012 7:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Nakamura Kanzaburo dies at 57


Nakamura Kanzaburo, one of the leading lights of the Kabuki stage, died Dec. 5 at a Tokyo hospital. He was 57.The cause of death was acute respiratory distress syndrome.

Nakamura was 18th in the line of Kabuki actors given the name Nakamura Kanzaburo. He assumed the name in 2005. His real name was Noriaki Namino.
Nakamura was a versatile actor who ventured into various genres beyond the borders of traditional performing art, including television and stage dramas.
He was known for performances of both open-handed young adult male and winsome female roles in traditional Kabuki.

Nakamura started Cocoon Kabuki in 1994 at the Theater Cocoon in Tokyo in collaboration with artistic director Kazuyoshi Kushida. Their productions, all modern interpretations of plays from the traditional Kabuki repertoire, attracted many young people to Kabuki.He also starred in popular stage director Hideki Noda's new kabuki productions, including his version of "Togitatsu no Utare" (Revenge of Togitatsu) in 2001.

In 2000, he started Heisei Nakamuraza, a Kabuki theater company that toured the nation and overseas. It preformed "Natsumatsuri Naniwa Kagami" (A mirror of the summer festival in Osaka) in New York in 2004, receiving acclaim from American critics.

In 1999, Nakamura performed the main role in a period drama, "Genroku Ryoran," playing Oishi Kuranosuke, the leader of 47 samurai who avenged the death of their lord. It was aired by Japan Broadcasting Corp. (NHK).In the same year, he acted as the emcee for the men's team in NHK's popular year-end "Red and White" singing contest.

He was awarded the Asahi Perfroming Arts Award in 2002, the Kikuchi Kan Prize in 2004 and the Medal with Purple Ribbon in 2008.

Performing art critic Tamotsu Watanabe said Nakamura was a dedicated scholar with a sharp and unique talent.

Watanabe mourned the loss of Nakamura at such a relatively young age, saying he would have gone on to demonstrate performances of an even broader range and greater depth.

"It is very regrettable because he must have been eager to perform on the renovated Kabukiza," Watanabe said, referring to the nation's main theater for Kabuki performances in Tokyo, which is scheduled to reopen next spring.

Nakamura announced in June he had been diagnosed with esophageal cancer and underwent surgery in July. While the operation was successful, he developed pneumonia.

Nakamura's father, the late 17th Nakamura Kanzaburo, was a living national treasure.

The younger Nakamura made his debut in 1959 at age 3 as the fifth Nakamura Kankuro in "Mukashibanashi Momotaro."

His best-known performances include "Kamiyui Shinza" (Shinza the barber) and "Sugawara Denju Tenarai Kagami" (Sugawara and the secrets of calligraphy).

He is survived by his wife and two sons, both Kabuki actors.
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 07, 2012 1:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

gaijinmark wrote:
Nakamura Kanzaburo dies at 57


Nakamura Kanzaburo, one of the leading lights of the Kabuki stage, died Dec. 5 at a Tokyo hospital. He was 57.The cause of death was acute respiratory distress syndrome.

Nakamura was 18th in the line of Kabuki actors given the name Nakamura Kanzaburo. He assumed the name in 2005. His real name was Noriaki Namino.
Nakamura was a versatile actor who ventured into various genres beyond the borders of traditional performing art, including television and stage dramas.
He was known for performances of both open-handed young adult male and winsome female roles in traditional Kabuki.

Nakamura started Cocoon Kabuki in 1994 at the Theater Cocoon in Tokyo in collaboration with artistic director Kazuyoshi Kushida. Their productions, all modern interpretations of plays from the traditional Kabuki repertoire, attracted many young people to Kabuki.He also starred in popular stage director Hideki Noda's new kabuki productions, including his version of "Togitatsu no Utare" (Revenge of Togitatsu) in 2001.

In 2000, he started Heisei Nakamuraza, a Kabuki theater company that toured the nation and overseas. It preformed "Natsumatsuri Naniwa Kagami" (A mirror of the summer festival in Osaka) in New York in 2004, receiving acclaim from American critics.

In 1999, Nakamura performed the main role in a period drama, "Genroku Ryoran," playing Oishi Kuranosuke, the leader of 47 samurai who avenged the death of their lord. It was aired by Japan Broadcasting Corp. (NHK).In the same year, he acted as the emcee for the men's team in NHK's popular year-end "Red and White" singing contest.

He was awarded the Asahi Perfroming Arts Award in 2002, the Kikuchi Kan Prize in 2004 and the Medal with Purple Ribbon in 2008.

Performing art critic Tamotsu Watanabe said Nakamura was a dedicated scholar with a sharp and unique talent.

Watanabe mourned the loss of Nakamura at such a relatively young age, saying he would have gone on to demonstrate performances of an even broader range and greater depth.

"It is very regrettable because he must have been eager to perform on the renovated Kabukiza," Watanabe said, referring to the nation's main theater for Kabuki performances in Tokyo, which is scheduled to reopen next spring.

Nakamura announced in June he had been diagnosed with esophageal cancer and underwent surgery in July. While the operation was successful, he developed pneumonia.

Nakamura's father, the late 17th Nakamura Kanzaburo, was a living national treasure.

The younger Nakamura made his debut in 1959 at age 3 as the fifth Nakamura Kankuro in "Mukashibanashi Momotaro."

His best-known performances include "Kamiyui Shinza" (Shinza the barber) and "Sugawara Denju Tenarai Kagami" (Sugawara and the secrets of calligraphy).

He is survived by his wife and two sons, both Kabuki actors.


This is sad news. He was younger than I am.

I saw a special about him about 10 years ago. In it there were scenes with him and his dying father, who, as the article mentions, was a living national treasure. Shortly after his father's death, he inherited his father's name. The special showed just how important he, and his family, are in the world of kabuki.

I will remember him from the 1999 Taiga Genroku Ryoran (aka Chushingura) where he had the principal role playing Oishi Kuranosuke, the leader of the 47 ronin. It's about as good a performance as you'll see in dorama. In the many depictions of Oishi I have seen, he is always portrayed as this noble idealized figure. Nakamura played it differently. His Oishi was an earthy, humorous, regular-Joe kind of guy who was put in a difficult situation that, at the beginning, he was very ill-equpped to handle. He was in over his head, and for much of the dorama, it showed how he struggled and often fell short in his efforts. For those of you who appreciate quality in both story and acting, I'd highly recommend this Taiga.
He was a very talented actor.
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2012 3:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Here's Kanzaburo's obit in the N.Y. Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/07/theater/kanzaburo-nakamura-kabuki-star-dies-at-57.html

In the obit they have a link to a YouTube performance of his using the music of Shiina Ringo. Anybody that says these guys aren't athletes doesn't know what the hell he's talking about.
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 25, 2012 9:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

'Barefoot Gen' author dead at 73

HIROSHIMA — Keiji Nakazawa, author of "Hadashi no Gen" ("Barefoot Gen"), an iconic comic about the 1945 Hiroshima atomic bombing, has died of lung cancer at a hospital in the city, sources said Tuesday. He was 73.

Nakazawa, who died last Wednesday, based "Barefoot Gen" on his own life, telling the story of a boy who survived the U.S. atomic bombing of Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945.

The popular antiwar story, which was serialized in the 1970s and 1980s, is based on his experience of the atomic bombing at age 6 while on his way to school about 1.2 km from the hypocenter.

He lost his father, older sister and younger brother, and survived with his mother and older brother.

The story played a vital role in the education of Japanese youth, especially elementary and junior high school children, many of whom were introduced to the Hiroshima bombing and war through Nakazawa's work. It has also been translated in various languages, including English, French, Korean, Thai and Russian.

Hiroshima Mayor Kazumi Matsui expressed hope that the comic strip will continue to be "passed on to the next generation" and tell the horror of the atomic bombing to many people in Japan and around the world.

After publisher Choubunsha Publishing Co. released it in 1975 in the form of comic books, they were placed in school libraries. Choubunsha said it had sold more than 10 million copies as of December.

Nakazawa had battled lung cancer since it was detected in 2010. He stopped writing during his final years due to poor vision.
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2013 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Noriko Sengoku passes away at 90

Actress Noriko Sengoku passed away on December 27. She was 90. Her career began in community theater in Shinjuku, Tokyo before she signed with Toho in 1947. Shefs best known abroad for her work with Akira Kurosawa in films such as Drunken Angel (1948), Stray Dog (1949), The Quiet Duel (1949), Scandal (1950), The Idiot (1951) and Seven Samurai (1954). She also appeared in Masaki Kobayashifs Kwaidan (1964), Yasuzo Masumurafs Blind Beast (1969), Takehiro Nakajimafs Okoge (1992).
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2013 6:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

gaijinmark wrote:
Noriko Sengoku passes away at 90

Actress Noriko Sengoku passed away on December 27. She was 90. Her career began in community theater in Shinjuku, Tokyo before she signed with Toho in 1947. Shefs best known abroad for her work with Akira Kurosawa in films such as Drunken Angel (1948), Stray Dog (1949), The Quiet Duel (1949), Scandal (1950), The Idiot (1951) and Seven Samurai (1954). She also appeared in Masaki Kobayashifs Kwaidan (1964), Yasuzo Masumurafs Blind Beast (1969), Takehiro Nakajimafs Okoge (1992).


RIP.

I don't remember her in Stray Dog, but it is a marvellous film that gets overlooked when people talk about Kurosawa.
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2013 5:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

junny wrote:

I don't remember her in Stray Dog, but it is a marvellous film that gets overlooked when people talk about Kurosawa.


I've seen her listed in the credits either as "girl" or "gun moll" depending on who translated the credits.
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 1:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Kabuki actor Ishikawa Danjuro XII passes away

On February 3rd at 9:59 pm, famous Kabuki actor Ishikawa Danjuro XII passed away at the age of 66 due to complications from pneumonia at the Toranomon hospital in Tokyo. He was the twelfth one to inherit the illustrious name Ichikawa Danjuro.

Back in 2004, Ishikawa was diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia, and he made a comeback after enduring a heroic treatment. However, he was hospitalized since in December of last year after he developed symptoms of pneumonia.

Source; Sanspo
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2013 6:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Actor Mikuni Rentaro passes away at 90

Famed Japanese actor Mikuni Rentaro passed away due to an acute heart failure at a hospital in the morning of April 14th. He was 90 years old.

Mikuni has appeared in over 150 films and won three Japanese Academy Awards for Best Actor in his career. His last film was last yearfs eWaga Haha no Kie directed by Harada Masato.

Actor Sato Koichi, Mikunifs oldest son, took some time after the press conference of his upcoming drama on the 15th to answer a few questions related to his fatherfs death.

He expressed with his head bowed, gI wasnft present when he passed away.h He continued, gI donft think that I felt sadness when I saw the face of my dead father. These past years he looked the most dignified in his life. He still had this dignity in his face after passing away. It was strangely moving to see, but it didnft bring tears to my eyes.h

Mikuni had been hospitalized for almost a whole year before his death. gHe was 90 years old, so I already resigned myself to receive this notification at some time or another. I was told that he passed away without suffering much,h said Sato Koichi.

gMy father once told me that he doesnft want his death to be announced at all. He wants a secret burial, doesnft need a kaimyo (posthumous Buddhist name) and would like for his bones to be scattered. He just wanted to be the actor Mikuni until the end, since he dedicated his whole life being him.h

Source: eiga.com
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